Posted in Artists, Creativity, Great Quotes, Learning, Parenting

Fostering Creativity

Spider-Man
Spider-Man by Matthew Denton

Creativity is the spice of life. As a mother of an artist and a judge I understand the need to allow kids to think differently even when it seems silly. Providing opportunities for kids to use their talents (gifts) whether it’s math and science-related or drawing or music is important. “Practice makes perfect” is true.

My “gift” is computer support. I know. Boring. But that is probably why the creative process is so intriguing to me. The illustration above was drawn by my son. Early on we knew he had a talent for drawing. We made every effort to provide the tools that he needed and opportunities to hone his skills. He is now a video animator and makes video games and movies.

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination. – Albert Einstein

Apple’s commentary on people who draw outside the lines and think outside the box:

Here’s to the Crazy Ones.
The misfits.
The rebels.
The troublemakers.
The round pegs in the square holes.
The ones who see things differently.
They’re not fond of rules.
And they have no respect for the status quo.
You can quote them, disagree with them,
disbelieve them, glorify or vilify them.
About the only thing that you can’t do, is ignore them.
Because they change things.
They invent. They imagine. They heal.
They explore. They create. They inspire.
They push the human race forward.
Maybe they have to be crazy.
How else can you stare at an empty canvas and see a work of art?
Or, sit in silence and hear a song that hasn’t been written?
Or, gaze at a red planet and see a laboratory on wheels?
We make tools for these kinds of people.
While some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius.
Because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world,
are the ones who do.

Here are a few quotes from folks who couldn’t think outside of a box (or paper bag).

  • “Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons.” –Popular Mechanics, forecasting the relentless march of science, 1949
  • “I think there is a world market for maybe five computers.” –Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, 1943
  • “I have traveled the length and breadth of this country and talked with the best people, and I can assure you that data processing is a fad that won’t last out the year.” –The editor in charge of business books for Prentice Hall, 1957
  • “But what … is it good for?” –Engineer at the Advanced Computing Systems Division of IBM, 1968, commenting on the microchip.
  • “There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.” –Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corp., 1977 — bought out by Compaq which was bought out by Hewlett Packard.
  • “This ‘telephone’ has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us.” –Western Union internal memo, 1876.
  • “The wireless music box has no imaginable commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to nobody in particular?” –David Sarnoff’s associates in response to his urgings for investment in the radio in the 1920s.
  • “The concept is interesting and well-formed, but in order to earn better than a ‘C,’ the idea must be feasible.” –A Yale University management professor in response to Fred Smith’s paper proposing reliable overnight delivery service. (Smith went on to found Federal Express Corp.)
  • “Who the hell wants to hear actors talk?” –H. M. Warner, Warner Brothers, 1927.
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The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched - they must be felt with the heart. ~ Helen Keller